Mike Benard: Herpetological photos, video, and stories

Amphibians and reptiles have fascinated me since I was a child. Here you can find my photos, video, and writing about these incredible creatures. To the right are links to video galleries of singing frogs and animal behavior. At the bottom of this page are links to some other popular articles on these animals.

Please feel free to contact me if you have questions about these animals. If you would like to use the images, videos, or writing, please send me an email at: mfbenard (at) gmail.com

I am a biologist at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. You can learn more about the research projects undertaken by me and my students at the Benard Lab website.

Check out occasional posts on my blog, Natural History on the Web.

Follow me on twitter: Mike Benard Herpetology Twitter @BenardMF

Check out my Flickr Photostream

Frog Calling Videos

Videos in this gallery show a variety of North American frogs and toads making their distinctive calls in an effort to attract mates.

Animal Behavior Videos

Videos in this gallery show many different animal behaviors, from salamanders eating bugs, to spiders dealing with the rain, to elephant seals blustering and bellowing.

Pacific Chorus Frog Natural History

The Pacific Chorus Frog Page describes the natural history of this widespread North American frog. You can also read some short blog posts on Pacific Chorus Frogs hanging out in eagle nests, riding Christmas Trees, and showing up in movies.

Spotted Salamander Button

During the spring breeiding season, Spotted Salamanders migrate from burrows in the forest to temporary wetlands where they will breed. You can tell apart male and female spotted salamanders by looking at their cloaca during the breeding season. In contrast, the sex of many frog species can be told apart by looking at their thumbs.

Gray Treefrog Tadpole Button

Gray treefrogs develop bright red tails when they smell predators in the water with them. The bright red tails help distract strikes away from their bodies. This is just one example of the many ways amphibians respond to predators. Other responses includind changing tail shape and metamorphosing at a smaller size.

Inside a wasp nest.

A couple years ago I got to peek inside a wasp next. Positioned in and around the hexagonal cells of the next were all four life stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.

Albino Toad Egg Development

I raised the eggs of an albino female toad , and found that after only a few days, the male's genes turned on and the toad tadpoles developed dark pigment.

Coloring page of snakes

These amphibian and reptile coloring pages are based on photos of wild herps. Many different pages are available as pdfs to download, print and color!